Alyssa Milano shrunk the COVID-19 Virus – inside Her …

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HomeCoronavirusAlyssa Milano Contracted the COVID-19 Virus – Inside Her Traumatizing Experience

August 08, 2020 | by Jaimie-lee Prince

About Alyssa
Alyssa is a feminine given name with multiple origins.

Alyssa Milano Contracted the COVID-19 Virus – Inside Her …

About Milano
Milan (, US also ; Italian: Milano [miˈlaːno] (listen); Milanese: [miˈlãː] (listen)) is a city in northern Italy, capital of Lombardy, and the second-most populous city in Italy after Rome. Milan served as the capital of the Western Roman Empire, the Duchy of Milan and the Kingdom of Lombardy–Venetia.
The city proper has a population of about 1.4 million while its metropolitan city has 3.26 million inhabitants. Its continuously built-up urban area, that stretches well beyond the boundaries of the administrative metropolitan city, is the fourth largest in the EU with 5.27 million inhabitants. The population within the wider Milan metropolitan area, also known as Greater Milan, is estimated at 8.2 million, making it by far the largest metropolitan area in Italy and the 3rd largest in the EU.Milan is considered a leading alpha global city, with strengths in the fields of art, commerce, design, education, entertainment, fashion, finance, healthcare, media, services, research and tourism. Its business district hosts Italy’s stock exchange (Italian: Borsa Italiana), and the headquarters of national and international banks and companies. In terms of GDP, it has the second-largest economy among EU cities after Paris, and is the wealthiest among EU non-capital cities. Milan is considered part of the Blue Banana and one of the “Four Motors for Europe”.
The city has been recognized as one of the world’s four fashion capitals thanks to several international events and fairs, including Milan Fashion Week and the Milan Furniture Fair, which are currently among the world’s biggest in terms of revenue, visitors and growth. It hosted the Universal Exposition in 1906 and 2015. The city hosts numerous cultural institutions, academies and universities, with 11% of the national total of enrolled students. Milan is the destination of 8 million overseas visitors every year, attracted by its museums and art galleries that include some of the most important collections in the world, including major works by Leonardo da Vinci. The city is served by many luxury hotels and is the fifth-most starred in the world by Michelin Guide. The city is home to two of Europe’s most successful football teams, A.C. Milan and F.C. Internazionale, and one of Europe’s main basketball teams, Olimpia Milano. Milan will host the 2026 Winter Olympics together with Cortina d’Ampezzo.

Alyssa Milano is warning others after testing negative thrice for COVID-19 before finally receiving a positive result. The actress said she felt like she was dying in a lengthy post detailing her experience. 

Alyssa Milano, 47, was allegedly sick with COVID-19 for at least two weeks. In a post shared , the “Charmed” star explained what happened to her and why she believes testing is flawed. 

Alyssa Milano Contracted the COVID-19 Virus – Inside Her …

Milano included a photo of her on a ventilator as she battled against the illness in April. She first became sick in March, when she experienced several of the symptoms associated with COVID-19. Her post is found below.

Alyssa Milano leaves ABC's The View on October 16, 2019 | Photo: Getty ImagesAlyssa Milano leaves ABC's The View on October 16, 2019 | Photo: Getty Images

Alyssa Milano leaves ABC’s “The View” on October 16, 2019 | Photo: Getty Images

MILANO LISTS SYMPTOMS AMID NEGATIVE COVID RESULTS

The actress lost nine pounds over two weeks. Yet two tests in March both showed negative results for the novel coronavirus. When Milano started to feel better, she took an antibody test. 

According to , positive antibody test results indicated that a person was exposed to COVID-19. However, Milano’s result was negative. She continued to endure the symptoms on a less intense level. 

After four months, Milano underwent a blood-drawn antibody test. This time, it showed she was positive for COVID antibodies. The actress : “I just want you to be aware that our testing system is flawed.”

Alyssa Milano attends the Showtime Emmy Eve Nominees Celebration at Chateau Marmont on September 16, 2018 | Photo: Getty ImagesAlyssa Milano attends the Showtime Emmy Eve Nominees Celebration at Chateau Marmont on September 16, 2018 | Photo: Getty Images

Alyssa Milano attends the Showtime Emmy Eve Nominees Celebration at Chateau Marmont on September 16, 2018 | Photo: Getty Images

SHE IMPLORES FOLLOWERS TO TAKE PRECAUTIONS

She claimed that the real number of cases for COVID-19 is unknown. She :  “I also want you to know, this illness is not a hoax. I thought I was dying. It felt like I was dying.”

Milano noted that she would donate her plasma towards research for finding a COVID-19 treatment or cure. She ended by imploring her fans to take care of themselves, wear masks, wash their hands, and social distance. 

View this post on Instagram

This was me on April 2nd after being sick for 2 weeks. I had never been this kind of sick. Everything hurt. Loss of smell. It felt like an elephant was sitting on my chest. I couldn’t breathe. I couldn’t keep food in me. I lost 9 pounds in 2 weeks. I was confused. Low grade fever. And the headaches were horrible. I basically had every Covid symptom. At the very end of march I took two covid19 tests and both were negative. I also took a covid antibody test (the finger prick test) after I was feeling a bit better. NEGATIVE. After living the last 4 months with lingering symptoms like, vertigo, stomach abnormalities, irregular periods, heart palpitations, shortness of breath, zero short term memory, and general malaise, I went and got an antibody test from a blood draw (not the finger prick) from a lab. I am POSITIVE for covid antibodies. I had Covid19. I just want you to be aware that our testing system is flawed and we don’t know the real numbers. I also want you to know, this illness is not a hoax. I thought I was dying. It felt like I was dying. I will be donating my plasma with hopes that I might save a life. Please take care of yourselves. Please wash your hands and wear a mask and social distance. I don’t want anyone to feel the way I felt. Be well. I love you all (well, maybe not the trolls. Just the kind people.)❤️

DANCING ON TIK TOK IN MID-MARCH

Milano appeared to be feeling fine , around the time she would have just gotten sick. She took to Tik Tok and posted a video of herself dancing to the popular song, “Bored in the House.” 

At the time, the actress seemed happy as she danced away on the popular app while voicing the words to the catchy tune. She was in quarantine with kids Milo, eight, and Elizabella, five. 

“WHO’S THE BOSS” RETURNS TO TV WITH SEQUEL

In addition to her role in “Charmed,” Milano is also known for once playing Samantha Micelli alongside Tony Danza, who played her dad in the 80s sitcom, “Who’s the Boss.” 

WHO'S THE BOSS ? - Gallery - Season Four - 11/10/87, Alyssa Milano (Samantha) | Photo: Getty ImagesWHO'S THE BOSS ? - Gallery - Season Four - 11/10/87, Alyssa Milano (Samantha) | Photo: Getty Images

WHO’S THE BOSS ? – Gallery – Season Four – 11/10/87, Alyssa Milano (Samantha) | Photo: Getty Images

Fans were thrilled to hear that the old series to television with a sequel set 30 years after the original. In new episodes, Samantha is featured as a single mom, and her father is retired. 

HER KIDS LOOK JUST LIKE HER

While Milano began her acting career very young, her kids do not seem to have picked up the bug yet. Milan shares both children with her husband, Dave Bugliari. 

View this post on Instagram

This is all that matters and the only place I want to be.

Most think that the tots look like their mom, but Milano that their personality includes aspects from both parents. Milano also does her best to raise her kids with a sense of awareness and values.

ⓘ We at AmoMama do our best to give you the most updated news regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, but the situation is constantly changing. We encourage readers to refer to the online updates from CDС, WHO, or Local Health Departments to stay updated. Take care!

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