Samsung guarantees three 'generations' of Android OS updates for …

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Samsung is promising to “support three generations of Android updates” for Galaxy phones, but that won’t apply to all the phones it makes. Samsung says it will happen for phones from the Galaxy S10 and newer, but that some of its lower A-series phones may not be up to it. In a statement to The Verge, Samsung clarifies that the guarantee “applies to S, N and Z Series. A Series will support until hardware allows.”

The original promise flew by near the end of its Unpacked keynote for the Galaxy Note 20 Ultra (and many other devices). Samsung has made big strides in offering Android updates in recent years, reducing the amount of time Galaxy S owners have needed to wait for OS updates by months. However, because of the way the Android ecosystem is structured, Samsung can’t update its phones as quickly as Google can and obviously lags behind Apple. Generally, however, things are improving across the entire Android ecosystem.

About Samsung
Samsung (means “three stars” in English) is a South Korean multinational conglomerate headquartered in Samsung Town, Seoul. It comprises numerous affiliated businesses, most of them united under the Samsung brand, and is the largest South Korean chaebol (business conglomerate).
Samsung was founded by Lee Byung-chul in 1938 as a trading company. Over the next three decades, the group diversified into areas including food processing, textiles, insurance, securities, and retail. Samsung entered the electronics industry in the late 1960s and the construction and shipbuilding industries in the mid-1970s; these areas would drive its subsequent growth. Following Lee’s death in 1987, Samsung was separated into four business groups – Samsung Group, Shinsegae Group, CJ Group and Hansol Group. Since 1990, Samsung has increasingly globalised its activities and electronics; in particular, its mobile phones and semiconductors have become its most important source of income. As of 2017, Samsung has the 6th highest global brand value.Notable Samsung industrial affiliates include Samsung Electronics (the world’s largest information technology company, consumer electronics maker and chipmaker measured by 2017 revenues), Samsung Heavy Industries (the world’s 2nd largest shipbuilder measured by 2010 revenues), and Samsung Engineering and Samsung C&T (respectively the world’s 13th and 36th largest construction companies). Other notable subsidiaries include Samsung Life Insurance (the world’s 14th largest life insurance company), Samsung Everland (operator of Everland Resort, the oldest theme park in South Korea) and Cheil Worldwide (the world’s 15th largest advertising agency, as measured by 2012 revenues).Samsung has a powerful influence on South Korea’s economic development, politics, media and culture and has been a major driving force behind the “Miracle on the Han River”. Its affiliate companies produce around a fifth of South Korea’s total exports. Samsung’s revenue was equal to 17% of South Korea’s $1,082 billion GDP.

Samsung guarantees three 'generations' of Android OS updates for …

About guarantees
A contract is a legally binding document that recognizes and governs the rights and duties of the parties to the agreement. A contract is legally enforceable because it meets the requirements and approval of the law. A contract typically involves the exchange of goods, service, money, or promise of any of those. “Breach of contract”, means that the law will have to award the injured party either the access to legal remedies such as damages or cancellation.In the Anglo-American common law, formation of a contract generally requires an offer, acceptance, consideration, and mutual intent to be bound. Each party must be those who are binding by the contract. Although most oral contracts are binding, some types of contracts may require formalities such as being in writing or by deed.In the civil law tradition, contract law is a branch of the law of obligations.Each country recognised by private international law has its own national system of law to govern contracts. Although systems of contract law might have similarities, they may contain significant differences. Accordingly, many contracts contain a choice of law clause and a jurisdiction clause. These provisions set the laws of the country which will govern the contract, and the country or other forum in which disputes will be resolved, respectively. Failing express agreement on such matters in the contract itself, countries have rules to determine the law governing the contract and the jurisdiction for disputes. For example, European Member States apply Article 4 of the Rome I Regulation to decide the law governing the contract, and the Brussels I Regulation to decide jurisdiction.

Samsung had no comment on whether it would be able to get those updates more quickly, unfortunately. There’s also the question of Samsung’s wording: “generations” as opposed to “OS versions” or “years” as you might expect. It’s likely there to give Samsung a little wiggle room if necessary — say, if there’s some sort of delay or if Google releases a major point update (imagine an Android 11.5) and Samsung isn’t ready to commit to multiple updates a year. Still, it’s probably a good idea to keep an eye on how well Samsung sticks to its promise.

This is still a huge commitment from Samsung. Samsung previously usually only promised two years of updates. The scale here is big, too. Just looking at its US store page right now, Samsung is currently selling more than 20 phones that would fall under this three-year guarantee. Samsung also needs to account for a vast array of regional builds for many of these phones.

Samsung guarantees three 'generations' of Android OS updates for …

But the phones Samsung sells the most of are its less expensive A-series devices, phones like the Galaxy A51 and A71. As they’re lower end, the company apparently isn’t sure that future iterations of Samsung’s version of Android will work on those phones. It’s unclear right now what the hardware requirements will be.