Sarri was like an uncomfortable visitor at Juventus – Tacchinardi …

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Sarri was dismissed on Saturday following Juve’s Champions League elimination at the hands of Lyon less than 24 hours earlier.

The 61-year-old secured Juve’s ninth Serie A title in a row in his only season in charge but lost the Coppa Italia final to Napoli, while problems instilling his style into the squad had prompted concerns about his long-term suitability to the role.

About uncomfortable
Comfort (or being comfortable) is a sense of physical or psychological ease, often characterized as a lack of hardship. Persons who are lacking in comfort are uncomfortable, or experiencing discomfort. A degree of psychological comfort can be achieved by recreating experiences that are associated with pleasant memories, such as engaging in familiar activities, maintaining the presence of familiar objects, and consumption of comfort foods. Comfort is a particular concern in health care, as providing comfort to the sick and injured is one goal of healthcare, and can facilitate recovery. Persons who are surrounded with things that provide psychological comfort may be described as being “in their comfort zone”. Because of the personal nature of positive associations, psychological comfort is highly subjective.The use of “comfort” as a verb generally implies that the subject is in a state of pain, suffering or affliction, and requires alleviation from that state. Where the term is used to describe the support given to someone who has experienced a tragedy, the word is synonymous with consolation or solace. However, comfort is used much more broadly, as one can provide physical comfort to someone who is not in a position to be uncomfortable. For example, a person might sit in a chair without discomfort, but still find the addition of a pillow to the chair to increase their feeling of comfort. Something that provides this type of comfort, which does not seek to relieve hardship, can also be referred to as being “comfy”. Like certain other terms describing positive feelings or abstractions (hope, charity, chastity), comfort may also be used as a personal name.

Sarri was like an uncomfortable guest at Juventus – Tacchinardi …

About Juventus
Juventus Football Club (from Latin: iuventūs, “youth”; Italian pronunciation: [juˈvɛntus]), colloquially known as Juventus and Juve (pronounced [ˈjuːve]), is a professional football club based in Turin, Piedmont, Italy, that competes in the Serie A, the top flight of Italian football. Nicknamed I Bianconeri (The Black and Whites) or La Vecchia Signora (The Old Lady), the club was founded in 1897 by a group of students from Turin. They have played home matches in grounds around its city, the latest being the 41,507-capacity Juventus Stadium since 2011.
Juventus has won 36 official league titles, 13 Coppa Italia titles, and eight Supercoppa Italiana titles, being the record holder for all these competitions; two Intercontinental Cups, two European Cups / UEFA Champions Leagues, one European Cup Winners’ Cup, a joint national record of three UEFA Cups, two UEFA Super Cups and a joint national record of one UEFA Intertoto Cup. Consequently, the side leads the historical Federazione Italiana Giuoco Calcio (FIGC) ranking, whilst on the international stage occupies the 5th position in Europe and the eleventh in the world for most confederation titles won with eleven trophies, having led the UEFA ranking during seven seasons since its inception in 1979, the most for an Italian team and joint second overall.
Founded with the name of Sport-Club Juventus, initially as an athletics club, it is the second oldest of its kind still active in the country after Genoa’s football section (1893) and has competed uninterruptedly in the top flight league (reformulated as Serie A from 1929) since its debut in 1900 after changing its name to Foot-Ball Club Juventus, with the exception of the 2006–07 season, being managed by the industrial Agnelli family almost continuously since 1923. The relationship between the club and that dynasty is the oldest and longest in national sports, making Juventus one of the first professional sporting clubs ante litteram in the country, having established itself as a major force in the national stage since the 1930s and at confederation level since the mid-1970s and becoming one of the first ten wealthiest in world football in terms of value, revenue and profit since the mid-1990s, being listed on the Borsa italiana since 2001.Under the management of Giovanni Trapattoni, the club won 13 trophies in the ten years before 1986, including six league titles and five international titles, and became the first to win all three seasonal competitions organised by the Union of European Football Associations: the 1976–77 UEFA Cup (first Southern European side to do so), the 1983–84 Cup Winners’ Cup and the 1984–85 European Cup. With successive triumphs in the 1984 European Super Cup and 1985 Intercontinental Cup, it became the first and thus far only in the world to complete a clean sweep of all confederation trophies; an achievement that they revalidated with the title won in the 1999 UEFA Intertoto Cup after another successful era led by Marcello Lippi, becoming in addition the only professional Italian club to have won every ongoing honour available to the first team and organised by a national or international football association. In December 2000, Juventus was ranked seventh in the FIFA’s historic ranking of the best clubs in the world and nine years later was ranked second best club in Europe during the 20th Century based on a statistical study series by the International Federation of Football History & Statistics (IFFHS), the highest for an Italian club in both.The club’s fan base is the largest at national level and one of the largest worldwide. Unlike most European sporting supporters’ groups, which are often concentrated around their own club’s city of origin, it is widespread throughout the whole country and the Italian diaspora, making Juventus a symbol of anticampanilismo (“anti-parochialism”) and italianità (“Italianness”). Juventus players have won eight Ballon d’Or awards, four of these in consecutive years (1982–1985, an overall record), among these the first player representing Serie A, Omar Sívori, as well as Michel Platini and three of the five recipients with Italian nationality as the former member of the youth sector Paolo Rossi; they have also won four FIFA World Player of the Year awards, with winners as Roberto Baggio and Zinedine Zidane, a national record and third and joint second highest overall, respectively, in the cited prizes. Additionally, players representing the club have won 11 Serie A Footballer of the Year awards including the only goalkeeper to win it, Gianluigi Buffon, and 17 players were inducted in the Serie A Team of the Year, being both also a record. Finally, the club has also provided the most players to the Italy national team—mostly in official competitions in almost uninterrupted way since 1924—who often formed the group that led the Azzurri squad to international success, most importantly in the 1934, 1982 and 2006 FIFA World Cups.

In that regard, Tacchinardi does not believe it was simply Friday’s 2-1 win over Lyon – which saw the Ligue 1 side progress to the Champions League quarter-finals on away goals – that forced Juve to make a change.

Tacchinardi also feels Juve’s squad planning left Sarri short-handed, with 21-year-old striker Marco Olivieri having been thrown on in the closing minutes for his Champions League debut as they desperately sought a third goal.

Sarri was like an uncomfortable guest at Juventus – Tacchinardi …

“I hadn’t received any signals from Turin, but I don’t think this defeat was necessary for Sarri to be sacked,” the former midfielder, who won six Serie A titles and the 1996 Champions League with the Bianconeri, told TMW Radio.

“He always seemed like a guest who did not feel at ease. At Napoli, he was a leader.

“There were many players in a precarious condition yesterday. Juve won officially but the only won who actually won was [Cristiano] Ronaldo.

“With all due respect to Olivieri, to think Juve let someone like [Mario] Mandzukic go makes you think.”

Real Madrid head coach and former Juve midfielder Zinedine Zidane is considered one of the favourites to replace Sarri, along with Lazio boss Simone Inzaghi and former Tottenham man Mauricio Pochettino.

There is also speculation Italy coach Roberto Mancini could be offered the position.

“Between Mancini and Zidane, I’d prefer the Frenchman,” Tacchinardi said. “He knows Juve and knows how to be respected, but Mancini would be okay, too. I think the national team coach could come.”