Satellite tv for pc pictures show Aftermath Of Beirut Blast

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Beruit’s port before (left) and after Tuesday’s explosion (right).

©2020 Maxar Technologies; BlackSky Global Monitoring

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©2020 Maxar Technologies; BlackSky Global Monitoring

Beruit’s port before (left) and after Tuesday’s explosion (right).

About Satellite
In the context of spaceflight, a satellite is an object that has been intentionally placed into orbit. These objects are called artificial satellites to distinguish them from natural satellites such as Earth’s Moon.
On 4 October 1957 the Soviet Union launched the world’s first artificial satellite, Sputnik 1. Since then, about 8,900 satellites from more than 40 countries have been launched. According to a 2018 estimate, some 5,000 remain in orbit. Of those about 1,900 were operational, while the rest have lived out their useful lives and become space debris. Approximately 63% of operational satellites are in low Earth orbit, 6% are in medium-Earth orbit (at 20,000 km), 29% are in geostationary orbit (at 36,000 km) and the remaining 2% are in elliptic orbit. In terms of countries with the most satellites the USA significantly leads the way with 859 satellites, China is second with 250, and Russia third with 146. These are then followed by Japan (72), India (55) and the UK (52).
A few large space stations have been launched in parts and assembled in orbit. Over a dozen space probes have been placed into orbit around other bodies and become artificial satellites of the Moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, a few asteroids, a comet and the Sun.
Satellites are used for many purposes. Among several other applications, they can be used to make star maps and maps of planetary surfaces, and also take pictures of planets they are launched into. Common types include military and civilian Earth observation satellites, communications satellites, navigation satellites, weather satellites, and space telescopes. Space stations and human spacecraft in orbit are also satellites.
Satellites can operate by themselves or as part of a larger system, a satellite formation or satellite constellation.
Satellite orbits vary greatly, depending on the purpose of the satellite, and are classified in a number of ways. Well-known (overlapping) classes include low Earth orbit, polar orbit, and geostationary orbit.
A launch vehicle is a rocket that places a satellite into orbit. Usually, it lifts off from a launch pad on land. Some are launched at sea from a submarine or a mobile maritime platform, or aboard a plane (see air launch to orbit).
Satellites are usually semi-independent computer-controlled systems. Satellite subsystems attend many tasks, such as power generation, thermal control, telemetry, attitude control, scientific instrumentation, communication, etc.

Satellite Images Show Aftermath Of Beirut Blast

About Images
An image (from Latin: imago) is an artifact that depicts visual perception, such as a photograph or other two-dimensional picture, that resembles a subject—usually a physical object—and thus provides a depiction of it. In the context of signal processing, an image is a distributed amplitude of color(s). A pictorial script is a writing system that employs images as symbols for various semantic entities, rather than the abstract signs used by alphabets.

©2020 Maxar Technologies; BlackSky Global Monitoring

New satellite photos show the aftermath of Tuesday’s massive, deadly explosion at the port of Beirut.

An image taken by the satellite company BlackSky shows extensive damage at the port following the blast. Several warehouses appear to be flattened and a cruise ship called the Orient Queen can be seen listing to one side, according to Allison Puccioni, an analyst and founder of Armillary Services, an independent firm partnered with BlackSky.

Satellite Images Show Aftermath Of Beirut Blast

“The entire warehouse infrastructure is leveled,” Puccioni says. “You can see some of the foundation and load-bearing columns in some of the buildings, but it’s just demolished.”

In the image, debris can also be seen covering a main road over 1,000 feet south of the blast site, a sign of the explosion’s force. And Puccioni says heavy damage extends for over half a mile into the city. The blast killed at least 100 people and injured thousands more.

The BlackSky image and an image by commercial company Planet show a plume of smoke or debris still rising from the site around 8 a.m. local time Wednesday over 12 hours after the explosion occurred.

Images taken later in the morning by the company Maxar show the main fire extinguished.

Reports suggest that the incident was triggered when a fire in one section of the port reached an enormous cache of ammonium nitrate fertilizer that had been offloaded years earlier. The explosion was so large that the U.S. Geological Survey registered it as a magnitude 3.3 earthquake.

A close-up of the port area by the commercial company Maxar.

©2020 Maxar Technologies

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©2020 Maxar Technologies

A close-up of the port area by the commercial company Maxar.

©2020 Maxar Technologies

Videos and reports suggest the shock wave traveled miles from the site, and windows were reportedly rattled as far away as Cyprus.

The blast was so big that some feared it might have been nuclear. Independent analysts quickly dismissed those rumors, but preliminary calculations show the explosion could have been in the 0.2 to 0.6 kiloton range. By comparison, the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima 75 years ago this week was 15 kilotons.

The full extent of the damage is difficult to assess from space because of Beirut’s older buildings and compact layout, Puccioni says. Still, she is astounded by the size of the blast. “I haven’t seen anything quite like it.”

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